Hunger Headlines- Week of September 8

See what is going on in the world of hunger this week. Check out these headlines:

Thought Leadership

Leadership Lesson: The Burden and Blessing

Feed the Children President and CEO Kevin Hagan writes this week about his responsibility as a leader. It’s a blessing he says to interact with thousands of children across the world who are blessed because of our programs, but he also feels the burden to do more! It’s a conviction that he hopes our staff around the world also feels. Read this post on Kevin’s blog.

Poverty News

Gap in Diet Quality Between Wealthiest and Poorest Americans Doubles, Study Finds

Although the study found that the diet of all Americans improved on average between 2005 and 2010, the progress masked a decline in diet quality among the poor. The result: a doubling of the gap in diet quality between the wealthiest Americans and the poorest. Access to quality food at supermarkets is a key. Read this National Geographic article.

Poverty rate higher in suburbs, than cities, including Seattle area

When we think of poverty in the US, our mind often goes to the inner city, assuming that poverty is concentrated in urban area. However, a new study released recently states otherwise. From 2000 to 2011, the number of Americans living below the federal poverty level ($23,492 for a family of four in 2012) rose about 36 percent, to 46.2 million. Contrast that with the number of suburban poor, which grew 64 percent. Read more in the Seattle Times article

Domestic Hunger News

America May Have Worst Hunger Problem of Any Rich Nation

According to Gallup’s findings, cited by the OECD, Americans are far more likely to say they were unable to pay for food than citizens of other rich countries. In 2011 and 2012, 21 percent of U.S. citizens reported food trouble, versus 8 percent of British survey takers, 6 percent of Swedes, and 5 percent of Germans. Estonia and Hungary had bigger problems with food affordability than the U.S., but both are relatively poor among Global North nations. Read the rest on Slate

Food-Stamp Use Starting to Fall

After soaring in the years since the recession, use of food stamps, one of the federal government’s biggest social-welfare programs, is beginning to decline. 46.2 million Americans received food stamps in May (the latest data available), down 1.6 million from a record 47.8 million in December 2012. Some 14.8% of the U.S. population is on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, down from 15.3% last August, U.S. Department of Agriculture data show. Read more good news on the Wall Street Journal.

International Hunger News

World Water Water Week: Five Countries Most Affected by Water Scarcity

At Feed the Children, we celebrated World Water Week August 31-September 5 with many other organizations. The World Water Week was instituted by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) in 1991 to raise awareness on water issues. Do you know the five countries most likely to face drought? Educate yourself. Read the International Business Times article here. 

Hunger Headlines – Week of August 25, 2014

See what is going on in the world of hunger this week. Check out these headlines:

Thought Leadership

Leadership Lesson: Taking Time to Celebrate

Feed the Children CEO and President, Kevin Hagan writes this week more about his recent visit to Kenya to launch the new Feed the Children brand in Africa. “We must celebrate our victories. It is so easy in the non-profit world to be overcome with the needs around the world that we don’t take time to stop and see how far we’ve come as industry.” Read the entire post here.

Poverty News

People in poverty tend to look for quick health fixes: study

People in low-income brackets are more likely to look for a quick fix when it comes to getting healthy, suggests a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Researchers at Concordia University in Montreal found that people in such brackets were less likely to try cutting back on sugar, working out more or drinking more water, and more likely to reach for diet pills, according to study leader Lisa Kakinami. Read this article on the New York Daily News.

If You Give Women in Poverty the Right Tools, They Will Flourish

When we raise up the women in the community, we also raise up the children. A new study examines the economic growth of several communities in Africa where women are given tools to thrive. Read this article on The Huffington Post.

Domestic Hunger News

Hit by poverty, Ferguson reflects the new suburbs

The violent confrontations between police and citizens in Ferguson, Missouri, highlight the rapid demographic shift in the suburbs, which are now home to a majority of the nation’s poor. There’s a growing number of people living below the poverty line in the suburbs, more than we might have imagined. Read this article on CBS Money Watch.

International Hunger News

Drought Hits Food Supplies in Central America

Central America is having one of its worst droughts in decades, and experts warned Thursday that major farm losses and the deaths of hundreds of cattle in the region could leave hundreds of thousands of families without food. The agricultural losses are largely in corn and beans, basic staples of the region’s diet, the United Nations’ World Food Program and the Food and Agriculture Organization said. Read this article on ABC News.

Ebola May Leave 1 Million People In Need Of Food Help

The deadly Ebola virus that has killed more than 1,000 in West Africa is disrupting the flow of goods, forcing the United Nations to plan food convoys for up to a million people as hunger threatens the largely impoverished area. Amid roadblocks manned by troops and pervasive fear among the population of the dreaded disease, the worst-ever outbreak of Ebola is increasingly impacting the food supply in three countries. Read this article on The Huffington Post.

Hunger Headlines, Week of June 22, 2014

Poverty News

There Are 400 Million More People In Poverty Than Previously Believed: Report

A new study more accurately reflecting “the actual lives of the poor” has been released, and the numbers are not worth celebrating. According to the Global Multidimensional Poverty Index 2014 produced by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative, roughly 1.6 billion people are living in poverty around the world — about 400 million more than what the World Bank claimed in 2010. Read the rest of the article on the Huffington Post.

Enlisting millennials in the fight against global poverty, one electronic music festival at a time

“If you look at who listens to EDM, it’s young people. It’s largely millennials. And our whole objective is to engage millennials in the fight to end extreme poverty,” says Evans, talking over lunch during a recent trip to the District. “If you want to be speaking to millennials, you’ve got to be speaking to [the artists] millennials are listening to. . . . I think that the people behind the music care deeply about these issues, and the question is: How do you create the right platform for them to express that?” Read the article on The Washington Post.

Domestic Hunger News

LA’s Johnny Appleseed teams up with Carson: Growing your food is ‘gangster’

Carson Daly has chosen to fight childhood hunger and promote healthy eating. He’s teamed up with KidsGardening.org, and they’re on a mission to grow a garden to teach kids about better food options. Full story on TODAY.

Three Hunger Words You Probably Misuse and Don’t Understand

If the child can’t get sufficient nutrition to stop and reverse the effects of stunting by the time he reaches the age of five, it’s too late. After age five, most of this damage to the child’s body and brain is permanent. This is why we are focusing more and more on providing good nutrition for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers. The first 1000 days of a child’s life (from conception to the child’s second birthday) are critical in order for her to grow and thrive throughout her life. See the infographic and read the full article here.

International Hunger News

Could Land Grabs Solve Global Hunger? Study Reveals Food Production Benefits Of Controversial Practice

Land grabbing is a controversial practice in which foreign investors buy the land of developing countries. A new examination shows the greater crop yields from agribusiness could feed millions more people than if local residents tended it themselves. Read this fascinating take on the practice here.

Ten Simple Ways To Help Children in 2014

The numbers are overwhelmingOne in five American households with children were unable to put adequate food on the table at times during the year. One in eight people around the world regularly do not get enough food to live an active life. These numbers represent precious human lives and millions of children who lack what they need to reach their potential.

If you find yourself looking at these numbers, concluding that the problem is too big, and turning away, you aren’t alone. But just for today, don’t. Sit with it for a minute. Then know this: Hunger is a big problem both in the United States and around the world, but you can help.

We asked our staff to suggest simple things that ordinary people could do to help, not to feel better about ourselves but to truly make life better for the people around us who are going without.

ten easy ways slideshow

You will also find many great ideas for schools, Girl and Boy Scout troops, churches, and more on our Special Projects page. If you need help putting a fundraising project together, we have a team standing by with experience and resources to make your project a success. Learn more and fill out the project application to get started!

We know you have some fantastic ideas, so share your ideas in the comments. Throughout this year, we will feature some of you and the ways you are making a difference every day. If you’re on Pinterest, pin your ideas to our board!

Top-Ten-01
Submitted by Robin Wood
Give your time (Four hours a week would be a tithe if you work a typical full time job) to serve a local rescue mission or food bank.

Top-Ten-02
Submitted by Jayme Cloninger
Leverage your skills in accounting, graphic design, business, etc., at your local community anti-hunger organization.

Top-Ten-03
Submitted by Tony Forrest
Sponsor a child in a developing country through Feed the Children. If you have them, involve your own children by sending letters and pictures to the sponsored child.

Top-Ten-04
Submitted by Tom Davis and Jayme Cloninger
Track your grocery and other food costs for one week. Then take the Food Stamp Challenge, living on $4/day/person for your food, and donate the money that you save that week to a local food bank. If you can’t make it on $4/day, spend more, but commit to donating the same amount you would have given otherwise plus the amount that you went over the limit.

Top-Ten-05.jpg
Submitted by Tamara Johnston and Justin Shumaker
Go in with your coworkers on a purchase from the FTC gift catalog.

Top-Ten-06.jpg
Submitted by Trevor Moe
Tell your member of Congress that together we can end hunger, and ask them to make a commitment to end child hunger. Call 1-800-826-3688 or find contact forms for your elected official here.

Top-Ten-07.jpg
Submitted by Jayme Cloninger
Host a movie night in your workplace, faith community or school to show a documentary on hunger (e.g., A Place at the Table). Follow up with discussions and brainstorming about what your group can do together to help.

Top-Ten-08
Submitted by Jayme Cloninger
We recommend (e.g., Closing the Food Gap, When Helping Hurts, A Place at the Table, and Beyond the Food Drive). What books do you recommend?

Top-Ten-09
Submitted by Kristen Mills and Minna Suh
Even if you don’t normally use cash, select certain purchases to pay for with cash this year. Save all the change (or, for an extra challenge, save your singles too). You will be AMAZED at how quickly this adds up.

Top-Ten-10
Submitted by Hogan Thomas
Workplace activities are fun! Participants pay a small fee that you donate to a local charity. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • sell 15-minute naps
  • host a game tournament (players pay a fee to participate)
  • allow employees to pay to take their dog to work
  • host a cook-off or bake-off (people pay to sample and vote),
  • host a Pay To Wear a Hat Day or a Wildest Tie or Most Outlandish Earring contest (entrants pay a fee)