“Do You Believe?” Feed the Children Chosen as Ministry Partner for New Film

True belief always requires action.

This is one of the central messages of the upcoming feature film DO YOU BELIEVE? opening around the country March 20. The cast includes Mira Sorvino, Sean Astin, Cybill Shepherd and Ted McGinley and is a project of Pure Flix Entertainment, the creators of last year’s God’s Not Dead. The new film tells the story of twelve strangers and the ways their lives intersect with one another to create positive change in their lives and communities.

We’re excited that Feed the Children has been selected as a charity partner for the film. Kevin Hagan, CEO of Feed the Children, says, “DO YOU BELIEVE? is a must-see film! It’s filled with so many truths of the power of love and the importance of not giving up on those who seem too far gone to help or save. At Feed the Children, we are in the business of not giving up—no matter how daunting the problem of child hunger is. We see on a day-to-day basis how one person, with God’s help, can forever alter the future and lives of people.”

Putting one’s beliefs into action isn’t just the message of DO YOU BELIEVE?—it’s a guiding principle behind Feed the Children’s work. We believe that kids thrive when they have access to food, clean water, a quality education and the chance for a better future. We put that belief into action through the work we do every day. But we don’t do this work alone—we partner with individuals and organizations around the country and world.

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A gift from the Feed the Children gift catalog makes a difference!

Like the couple who is signing up to sponsor a child because they believe in using their resources to make a difference in the life of a young person halfway around the world. Or the mother buying Easter gifts for her family who decides to shop from our gift catalog, because she’s committed to creating lasting change for a community in need.

Like parents and community members in Haiti meeting together in care groups because they believe community collaboration is the best way to overcome poverty.

Or the members of Faithbridge Church in Osage Beach, MO and friends from their community who spent a recent Saturday unloading a truck full of food and supplies for a local food pantry, because they believe in loving their neighbors through concrete action.

True belief always requires action.

Matt Panos, chief development officer of Feed the Children, says, “DO YOU BELIEVE? is a ‘celebration of grace’ and an important reminder for how we should love and care for our neighbors. It’s a real-life depiction of how believers and non-believers interact in everyday life with the subtle thread of Biblical teaching for how we, as Christians, should act toward each other and toward a world that is watching us.”

Join us at the movies… and in partnership as we put belief into action, so kids can be kids.

Making Your Year End Contributions Easy

It’s that time of year in the United States — with only three days left to think about your 2014 taxes — especially if you are a procrastinator like we are at our house.

It’s those days when you gather up receipts. You count your donations. And you ask yourself the question, did I give enough?

It’s the time of year you say to your spouse: “Wouldn’t you rather give our money to a charity than to pay taxes on it?”

If this is where you find yourself on this last week of 2014, then we have some great ideas for you to contribute in the most tangible of ways, at a variety of different price points.

1. Want to give less than $50?  Then why not give one food and one essential care box that feeds a family of four in the US for a week?

We recently told you the story of a Georgia family where the father lost his job but because of Feed the Children the kids had food for the week!  Giving this gift of $38 could mean the difference between hope and hopelessness for a family in the US.

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2. Want to give less than $100? Why not give a goat that will uplift a family in a country like Malawi?

Goats in places countries like Malawi, Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda, countries where we work, can mean the difference between prosperity and despair. We recently told you about a woman in Malawi who received two goats and it changed the course of her kids’ lives. Your donation could bring a smile like this!

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 3. Want to give give a gift that is just a little bit more? Could you give $113? With this end of year donation, you could provide all the food, care and support an abandoned baby needs to thrive in Kenya.

We recently told you the story of how one baby girl in our center came to us after a terrorist attack killed her parents. She found loving caregivers and hope for adoption because of Feed the Children donors. This could be you!

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If these price points don’t meet your needs– if you can give more or you could give less– here’s a link to a way you can make a donation in the amount of your choice.

Thank you donors, partners, and friends for helping Feed the Children champion kids all over the world!  We believe in a world where one day hunger will end, because together we will defeat it.

 

Typhoon Hagupit hits the Philippines

Another potentially devastating Typhoon has landed in the Central Philippines where thousands of families were displaced by Super Typhoon Haiyan last November.

Typhoon Hagupit (locally known in the Philippines as Typhoon Ruby) has slowed as it moves over land, which can create major flooding from the heavy rainfall, in addition to potentially damaging strong winds. Communication lines and electricity have been damanged and roads are impassable around the affected areas of Dolores and Cataingan. The extent of the typhoon’s impact remains unclear.

Before the typhoon made landfall, some 717,000 people were pre-emptively evacuated. An estimated 133,000 families are staying in 1,758 evacuation centers across the affected regions.

Our staff will be regularly checking with community leaders in the local communities we serve. Mobile kitchens will be established in affected areas, providing hot food fortified with VitaMeal. Bags of rice and bottled water will also be provided to children and families.

The Feed the Children team in the Philippines is planning to initially establish disaster response feeding stations in two provinces (Bohol and Cebu) to prepare hot, nutritious meals using VitaMeal, mixed with rice, milk, chocolate powder and sugar.

We’re working closely with local leaders, parents in the communities affected as well as groups trained and formed by Feed the Children Philippines, along with local government units and public schools. It’s expected that up to 30,000 persons will need 150,000 meals as a direct response.

In other areas that may be severely impacted by Typhoon Hagupit/Ruby – namely in the provinces of Masbate, Leyte and Samar) Feed the Children will mobilize to establish additional disaster response feeding stations. It’s forecasted the worst hit areas of the Samar provinces will need 107 feeding stations. A total of ten partner organizations are expected to assist us with those efforts.

Information on additional disaster response plans will be updated into next week once an assessment of the situation is completed.

If you would like to support our organization as we provide relief after this storm, please visit www.feedthechildren.org/hagupit.

Giving Tuesday: Give a Gift That Matters

Get some great deals on Black Friday? Wait until you see the gifts you can pick up from our gift catalog.

Today is the third annual ‘Giving Tuesday,’ which is a day reminding us to give back, and the internet is full of causes asking for donations. But do you really know where your money is going when you click ‘donate’?

For Giving Tuesday, we invite you to know your gift matters. Whether it’s a chicken, a book, a water purification system, or a semi-truck full of necessities, these gifts can help children and their families succeed.

We understand that it might be hard to decide with so many options, so here’s five gift suggestions to help you get started:

FEED A CLASS OF 50 CHILDREN ($20)

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Help feed school children with a traditional Githeri meal of corn and kidney beans. In our Kenya programs, Feed the Children serves meals to 140,229 children in 170 schools each school day. Your gift will help children thrive physically and mentally.

WATER PURIFICATION TABLETS FOR 2 FAMILIES FOR 1 YEAR ($29)

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Even clean water can become contaminated while being carried home or stored for later use. These tablets are one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent diarrhea and other waterborne health issues

1 GOAT ($79)

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Goats are great for families trying to overcome poverty – a source of meat, milk and income.

FISHING GEAR FOR 1 PERSON ($188)

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Teach a man to fish and you give him the tools to provide his family with food for a lifetime. You also provide a family with the means of a stable income when they sell the excess fish at the market.

1 SEMITRUCK LOADED WITH NECESSITIES FOR 400 FAMILIES ($15,000)

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Keep the trucks moving! Your gift helps Feed the Children pick up and deliver food and other essentials to communities across America. Thanks to caring friends like you, our 40 semitrucks will stay on the road to feed hungry families and children throughout our nation.

Whether your holiday shopping list contains a new toy or the hottest new device, be sure to make a difference this Giving Tuesday and help defeat hunger with Feed the Children.

Hunger Headlines Week of October 20th

These are stories catching our eyes this week. Click the headline to read the whole story.

Leader’s Corner

“We Must Take Risks”

Maybe the best thing we can do for our organizations is what nobody else is willing to do, by Feed the Children President and CEO Kevin Hagan

Poverty

“Over 48 million Americans live in poverty”

Over 48 million Americans live in poverty, according to a special report by the Census Bureau. What has the ability to change this? Jobs, jobs, and more jobs, this new study says. 

“Poverty and School Funding: why low income students often suffer.”

While the current U.S. economy continues to improve, there is one area that is still feeling the squeeze from the recession years: K-12 public school spending. Our funding for public schools has a lot to do with long term achievement of students, especially in urban areas.

“One in seven Australians living below the poverty line, survey reveals”

We think of Australia as one of the wealthiest countries in the world, but a new study shows that the rate of families in poverty is on the rise. Nearly 18% of children in the country live beneath the poverty line, one-third of them in sole-parent families,

Domestic Hunger

“Many of Iowa’s hungry are children”

A state known by many as the “bread basket” of the US struggles with hunger too. Children account for one in three of Iowa’s food pantry customers, a new survey of the state’s food pantries shows.

Do Minimum Wage Increases Benefit the Middle Class?

As rallies to increase the minimum wage across the United States continue, many are asking what happens to the middle class? Will their prosperity increase too?

International Hunger

Can we feed everyone?

We all want to live in a world where no child goes to bed hungry. But is this possible considering our current agricultural resources? One blogger explores this question.

Global Response to Ebola Highlights Challenges to Delivering Aid

As international NGOs join together to bring resources to the countries deeply devastated by Ebola, the progress is slow. The fear and stigma associated with the Ebola virus contributes to recruitment problems.

Feed the Children Responds to Ebola Outbreak

Feed the Children and Curamericas Global are partnering to help stop the spread of the deadly Ebola virus in Africa, and to assist those areas already infected with the disease.

Hunger Headlines Week of September 28, 2014

These are stories catching our eyes this week. Click the headline to read the whole story.

Leader’s Corner

“The Shame of NGOs Unwilling to Risk”

Three reasons why nonprofits avoid the risks of innovation, by Feed the Children President and CEO Kevin Hagan

 

Poverty

“Five Reasons Why We’re Losing the War on Poverty” 

Poverty does not appear to be waving the white flag anytime soon. While the official poverty rate in the United States recently declined for the first time in seven years, the war on destitution is far from over and feels like a losing battle for millions of Americans.

“Locking up parents for not paying child support can be a modern-day “‘debtor’s prison.'”

There’s a seismic shift going on in Virginia: treating parents who owe child support as more than just deadbeats.

“How our child support system can push the poor deeper into poverty”

Punishing deadbeat parents is supposed to help families — but it can have the opposite effect. In the United States, nearly one in four children are due some sort of child support. But only 62 percent of the money owed is actually paid.

 

Domestic Hunger

Bread for the World Highlights the 10 Hungriest and Poorest States

The states with the highest proportion of hungry and poor people are in the South, according to a Bread for the World analysis of the latest U.S. Census data. Several states in the region account for large portions of the more than 49 million Americans who were at risk of hunger and 45 million Americans who lived in poverty last year.

USDA offers $31.5M for healthier food stamp diet

A division of the Agriculture Department is making $31.5 million in funding available to help people on food stamps obtain healthier foods.

International Hunger

West Africa Ebola Crisis Hits Tourism, Compounds Hunger In Gambia

Pestilence, cyclical droughts and floods, and the West Africa Ebola crisis have pushed hunger to record levels in Gambia, where 200,000 people need urgent food assistance, the United Nations says.

Tourism is a significant source of income for the country, and even though Gambia has not seen cases of Ebola, the outbreak in the region has caused visitor numbers to plummet by 60 percent compared to last year, said Ade Mamonyane Lekoetje, the U.N. representative for Gambia.

Hunger pains: U.S. food program struggles to move forward

Virtually every other aid-giving country and the United Nations, which helps coordinate them, use a flexible system in which critically needed grains, oils and other commodities are purchased as close to a crisis or famine zone as possible. When appropriate, many also give cash transfers or vouchers instead of sacks of food, saving money and precious time getting aid to the young, the elderly, the sick and families in crisis.

But since 1954, Congress has mandated that Food for Peace, the flagship U.S. food aid program, primarily would buy American commodities from U.S. suppliers and transport them thousands of miles on U.S.-flagged ships, even when cheaper, faster and better alternatives exist. The journey often takes seven months, as the food moves from Midwestern fields to coastal ports, across the ocean and then by truck or even donkey to its intended recipients. By then, the food may be rotted or too late to be of much help.

Hunger Headlines- Week of September 25

See what is going on in the world of hunger this week. Check out these headlines:

Thought Leadership

Leadership Lesson: What Questions Are You Asking?

Feed the Children President and CEO Kevin Hagan writes this week about what forward-thinking organizations are all about: being curious. Though it might feel easier to assume or project to others that we have all the answers, Kevin says that we must be willing to ask great questions. Read more about some of the questions Feed the Children is asking itself, right on Kevin’s blog.

Poverty News

The U.S. is losing a generation to poverty

This week, when the United States Census Bureau released its poverty data for the year 2013, it showed the first significant decline in poverty since the Great Recession hit: down from 15 percent to 14.5. Greeted more cheerily by economic observers was the news that child poverty had made its biggest drop in years: down almost 2 whole percentage points. It was better news than observers expected. It’s all relative, though, and enthusiasm was qualified. These numbers are still higher than they were before the recession. Read the rest of the article at The Daily Beast.

Hunger News in the U.S.

Who can afford to eat healthy food in the United States?

We all know that good food for kids comes in the form of fruits and vegetables. But what if families don’t have access to these kinds of food? What if families who do have access to these kinds of foods can’t afford to buy them? A new study examines what it takes to eat well in the United States. Read more about this study on Business Cheat Sheet

Hunger News around the World

World hunger easing but 1 in 9 people undernourished: food agencies

Who is hungry in the world? The number of hungry people in the world has fallen sharply over the past decade but 805 million, or 1 in 9 of the global population, still do not have enough to eat, three U.N. food and agriculture agencies said recently. The number of chronically undernourished people dropped by more than 100 million, equivalent to a country the size of the Philippines, according to a report by the United Nations food agency (FAO), International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and World Food Programme (WFP). Read more of this article on Reuters.

Brazil Removed from UN World hunger map

Do you know what countries are on the UN hunger map? You can download it here

The Brazilian government Tuesday hailed a new United Nations report that for the first time removed Latin America’s biggest country from the World Hunger Map. “Leaving the Hunger Map is a historic milestone for Brazil. We are very proud because overcoming hunger was a priority for the Brazilian state,” Social Development Minister Tereza Campello said in a statement. Read this article on ABC News.

Hunger Headlines- Week of September 8

See what is going on in the world of hunger this week. Check out these headlines:

Thought Leadership

Leadership Lesson: The Burden and Blessing

Feed the Children President and CEO Kevin Hagan writes this week about his responsibility as a leader. It’s a blessing he says to interact with thousands of children across the world who are blessed because of our programs, but he also feels the burden to do more! It’s a conviction that he hopes our staff around the world also feels. Read this post on Kevin’s blog.

Poverty News

Gap in Diet Quality Between Wealthiest and Poorest Americans Doubles, Study Finds

Although the study found that the diet of all Americans improved on average between 2005 and 2010, the progress masked a decline in diet quality among the poor. The result: a doubling of the gap in diet quality between the wealthiest Americans and the poorest. Access to quality food at supermarkets is a key. Read this National Geographic article.

Poverty rate higher in suburbs, than cities, including Seattle area

When we think of poverty in the US, our mind often goes to the inner city, assuming that poverty is concentrated in urban area. However, a new study released recently states otherwise. From 2000 to 2011, the number of Americans living below the federal poverty level ($23,492 for a family of four in 2012) rose about 36 percent, to 46.2 million. Contrast that with the number of suburban poor, which grew 64 percent. Read more in the Seattle Times article

Domestic Hunger News

America May Have Worst Hunger Problem of Any Rich Nation

According to Gallup’s findings, cited by the OECD, Americans are far more likely to say they were unable to pay for food than citizens of other rich countries. In 2011 and 2012, 21 percent of U.S. citizens reported food trouble, versus 8 percent of British survey takers, 6 percent of Swedes, and 5 percent of Germans. Estonia and Hungary had bigger problems with food affordability than the U.S., but both are relatively poor among Global North nations. Read the rest on Slate

Food-Stamp Use Starting to Fall

After soaring in the years since the recession, use of food stamps, one of the federal government’s biggest social-welfare programs, is beginning to decline. 46.2 million Americans received food stamps in May (the latest data available), down 1.6 million from a record 47.8 million in December 2012. Some 14.8% of the U.S. population is on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, down from 15.3% last August, U.S. Department of Agriculture data show. Read more good news on the Wall Street Journal.

International Hunger News

World Water Water Week: Five Countries Most Affected by Water Scarcity

At Feed the Children, we celebrated World Water Week August 31-September 5 with many other organizations. The World Water Week was instituted by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) in 1991 to raise awareness on water issues. Do you know the five countries most likely to face drought? Educate yourself. Read the International Business Times article here. 

Hunger Headlines – Week of August 25, 2014

See what is going on in the world of hunger this week. Check out these headlines:

Thought Leadership

Leadership Lesson: Taking Time to Celebrate

Feed the Children CEO and President, Kevin Hagan writes this week more about his recent visit to Kenya to launch the new Feed the Children brand in Africa. “We must celebrate our victories. It is so easy in the non-profit world to be overcome with the needs around the world that we don’t take time to stop and see how far we’ve come as industry.” Read the entire post here.

Poverty News

People in poverty tend to look for quick health fixes: study

People in low-income brackets are more likely to look for a quick fix when it comes to getting healthy, suggests a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Researchers at Concordia University in Montreal found that people in such brackets were less likely to try cutting back on sugar, working out more or drinking more water, and more likely to reach for diet pills, according to study leader Lisa Kakinami. Read this article on the New York Daily News.

If You Give Women in Poverty the Right Tools, They Will Flourish

When we raise up the women in the community, we also raise up the children. A new study examines the economic growth of several communities in Africa where women are given tools to thrive. Read this article on The Huffington Post.

Domestic Hunger News

Hit by poverty, Ferguson reflects the new suburbs

The violent confrontations between police and citizens in Ferguson, Missouri, highlight the rapid demographic shift in the suburbs, which are now home to a majority of the nation’s poor. There’s a growing number of people living below the poverty line in the suburbs, more than we might have imagined. Read this article on CBS Money Watch.

International Hunger News

Drought Hits Food Supplies in Central America

Central America is having one of its worst droughts in decades, and experts warned Thursday that major farm losses and the deaths of hundreds of cattle in the region could leave hundreds of thousands of families without food. The agricultural losses are largely in corn and beans, basic staples of the region’s diet, the United Nations’ World Food Program and the Food and Agriculture Organization said. Read this article on ABC News.

Ebola May Leave 1 Million People In Need Of Food Help

The deadly Ebola virus that has killed more than 1,000 in West Africa is disrupting the flow of goods, forcing the United Nations to plan food convoys for up to a million people as hunger threatens the largely impoverished area. Amid roadblocks manned by troops and pervasive fear among the population of the dreaded disease, the worst-ever outbreak of Ebola is increasingly impacting the food supply in three countries. Read this article on The Huffington Post.

Hunger Headlines, Week of June 22, 2014

Poverty News

There Are 400 Million More People In Poverty Than Previously Believed: Report

A new study more accurately reflecting “the actual lives of the poor” has been released, and the numbers are not worth celebrating. According to the Global Multidimensional Poverty Index 2014 produced by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative, roughly 1.6 billion people are living in poverty around the world — about 400 million more than what the World Bank claimed in 2010. Read the rest of the article on the Huffington Post.

Enlisting millennials in the fight against global poverty, one electronic music festival at a time

“If you look at who listens to EDM, it’s young people. It’s largely millennials. And our whole objective is to engage millennials in the fight to end extreme poverty,” says Evans, talking over lunch during a recent trip to the District. “If you want to be speaking to millennials, you’ve got to be speaking to [the artists] millennials are listening to. . . . I think that the people behind the music care deeply about these issues, and the question is: How do you create the right platform for them to express that?” Read the article on The Washington Post.

Domestic Hunger News

LA’s Johnny Appleseed teams up with Carson: Growing your food is ‘gangster’

Carson Daly has chosen to fight childhood hunger and promote healthy eating. He’s teamed up with KidsGardening.org, and they’re on a mission to grow a garden to teach kids about better food options. Full story on TODAY.

Three Hunger Words You Probably Misuse and Don’t Understand

If the child can’t get sufficient nutrition to stop and reverse the effects of stunting by the time he reaches the age of five, it’s too late. After age five, most of this damage to the child’s body and brain is permanent. This is why we are focusing more and more on providing good nutrition for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers. The first 1000 days of a child’s life (from conception to the child’s second birthday) are critical in order for her to grow and thrive throughout her life. See the infographic and read the full article here.

International Hunger News

Could Land Grabs Solve Global Hunger? Study Reveals Food Production Benefits Of Controversial Practice

Land grabbing is a controversial practice in which foreign investors buy the land of developing countries. A new examination shows the greater crop yields from agribusiness could feed millions more people than if local residents tended it themselves. Read this fascinating take on the practice here.