Education is the Key: Jaqueline’s Story

Imagine having to choose which of your children will be the one to go to school. For too many parents around the world, this is the agonizing choice they must make.

Jaqueline is the lucky student in her household. Jaqueline, age 10, lives with her mother and two sisters in a small village in Nicaragua. Her older sister stays home with the younger one so their mother can work and Jaqueline can go to school. Each day between February and November Jaqueline joins almost 70 other students in a small school with three classrooms.

Jaqueline loves to play with dolls and toy kitchen sets. But she’s bright and imaginative enough to play with just about anything. During one recent visit she was seen amusing herself with a piece of plastic and a bunch of bottle caps. She enjoys her schoolwork too, and her favorite subject is literature. She loves to read, and even though she doesn’t own a book herself, she gobbles up the books her teacher brings to the classroom. She wants to be a teacher when she grows up, and she wants to teach the children in her community, in her words, “so they can study a lot.”

A decent education is one of the key elements in bringing kids out of poverty; in fact, it’s one the four pillars we focus on when engaging in community development. Education will give Jaqueline a fighting chance at a better life. But it’s a tough road. The unemployment rate is 90% where she lives, and her single mother ekes out a living working in tobacco, tomato and cucumber fields near their village. During harvesting season, Jaqueline’s mother earns about a hundred cordobas a day—that’s less than $4.

A wage like that is barely enough to keep the family’s pantry stocked with tortillas, rice and beans. A backpack full of school supplies would be unthinkable.

Unthinkable… except that individuals just like you have decided to stand with Jaqueline and help give her a future. Thanks to Feed the Children donors, partners, dedicated staff, and the engagement of the residents themselves, the unthinkable is now possible for Jaqueline and countless others.

*3-2015 NI0002 Jaqueline Morales  (1)Today, Jaqueline, her sisters, and other children in the village get a good nutritious meal five days a week. They receive shoes and other basics. And at the beginning of every school year, Jaqueline receives a backpack filled with school supplies that has allowed her to keep studying and help that dream of being a teacher to become a reality.

We know that helping lift children out of poverty is a multi-faceted process. For Jaqueline, a good meal means she’s able to focus on her studies without a grumbling belly. But the backpack gives her the supplies she needs to thrive in her studies. It’s also a tangible sign that we believe in her—that you believe in her.

Even at her young age, Jaqueline can see what this support has meant to her family: “Before, my mom was very sad when she could not pay for my school supplies, and she told me I would not be able to go to school. Now, I am happy, and she is happy, because I go to school.”

Jaqueline’s school year will be winding down soon—typically in Nicaragua, the children attend school between February and November. Here in the United States, however, the school year is well underway. Learn more about how our programs support education and how you can be a part of it.

Click a “Like,” Help a Child

Today we bring you a guest post from our friends at Solar Shield, and an easy opportunity to help kids across the U.S.! Read on…

The U.S. is a wealthy and plentiful country, but nearly 16 million American children wouldn’t know it. These kids live without many of life’s essentials, including food.  And it’s not just poor children who are going hungry. There are many families who live paycheck to paycheck or barely above poverty, to whom it only takes a hospital bill, an unexpected home repair or an interruption in utilities service due to late payment to force them to choose between two necessities. Food often loses.

Feed the Children’s vision is to create a world where no child goes to bed hungry, and they are committed to providing hope and resources for those without life’s essentials. This is easier said than done.  It takes many who are willing to pool their resources and expertise to work together for change.

Over the years, Feed the Children has recognized that the need goes beyond food. Many families also can’t buy other non-food essentials like clothing, soap, detergent, medicines, bedding and other items. This is why Feed the Children distributes essentials along with food, because they know that something as basic as a new toothbrush goes a long way toward keeping a child healthy and happy.

Solar Shield, the original and leading brand of fits overs and clip-on sunglasses, recognizes the importance of helping kids to be healthy and happy kids, without the worry of food or other necessities. As a sunglass company, Solar Shield’s vision is for kids to be able to play outdoors without damaging their eyes and to enable children to grow up with good eye-health habits. Kids get three times the annual sun exposure that adults do, and their young eyes are especially susceptible to UV-related harm. Unlike the mature lens of an adult eye, a child’s ocular lens cannot successfully filter out UV rays and more radiation reaches their retinas. Fortunately, the solution for protecting children’s eyes from UV exposure and damage is an easy one. They can wear sunglasses with 100% UV protection every day.

In an effort to make a difference, Solar Shield has partnered with Feed the Children through the “Like Us to Share a Pair” campaign. For every ‘like’ Solar Shield receives on Facebook during the campaign, they will donate a pair of sunglasses or reading glasses to Feed the Children to include with food donations.

The need is real and urgent. Donate to Feed the Children and “Like” the Solar Shield Facebook page and make a difference in children’s lives.

Hunger in America: The Children Need Your Voice

By John Ricketts

Tuesday, June 23, is National Call-In Day, a day set aside for people to call their congressional representatives and ask them to support federal school meal and child- nutrition programs. Hunger organizations across the country are working together to make this call-in day a success. Here’s why this initiative is so important to our work:

Prior to my work at Feed the Children, I served as a youth pastor for over 8 years and since 2010, I have led Feed the Children’s disaster-relief work. Two years ago, I was assigned to lead a new program at Feed the Children—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), which is a program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture that provides summer meals to food-insecure children. These children normally receive free or reduced-price meals during the school year, but over the summer, many of them are left without access to regular meals. I am proud to lead a team that now sponsors 58 sites where we serve 1,800 – 2,000 meals a day to children during the summer.

Summer meals sites are frequently held at libraries, camps, churches, or schools. While kids receive a meal at a site, they can also stay active and continue learning with the books, school supplies, backpacks, and sports supplies that Feed the Children provides. On kick-off day, I saw hundreds of enthusiastic kids at these sites. SFSP gives them the opportunity to eat a nutritious meal and stay on track during the summer so that they don’t fall behind when they return to school.

4-2015 TRIP2513 MWC Elementary Distribution SMorgan (52) copySFSP is just one of the ways Feed the Children combats hunger. Our distribution centers provide millions of pounds of food to individuals in all 50 states every year. We have also distributed over 700,000 backpacks filled with school supplies to students. While I love all of the great programs at Feed the Children, our summer program is special to me—not only because I work on it every day, but also because I see the impact of the meals and the mentoring that our sites provide children. This program brings together many stakeholders to improve the lives of some of our nation’s most vulnerable kids.

This type of development effort creates pathways for people to overcome their hardships. Through the support of the community and mentors, hopefully these kids will have brighter futures.

SFSP only works through the combined efforts of the public and private sphere. Nonprofits can create effective programs to reach the people in need, but the scale of the problem is so large that funding is often a challenge. Federal resources flowing through faith and community institutions lead to more kids being fed and mentored every day. By investing in our children and those in need, we can become a healthier and more productive nation.

While we have made great strides to improve children’s access to meals, we continue to face challenges. Because Oklahoma is largely a rural state, many students do not have transportation to the meal sites. The mandatory congregate rule requires that children eat the meal together in a certain location. In urban settings, I have witnessed parents instructing their children not to come out of their homes or apartment complexes to participate due to safety concerns, and therefore the congregate feeding rule prevents some children from having access to summer meals. Changing the requirement would help programs across the country reach more kids.

While we would hope that this issue would be nonpartisan, the political climate has made the discussion around feeding children politically charged. If Congress could find a way to work together, we could improve these programs to reach more children.

All of us at Feed the Children are working hard to change the tide of poverty and hunger in America. We especially care about making sure every child in America is adequately fed. We urge you to join us in showing support for important programs such as SFSP by calling your representative on June 23. It only takes a few minutes, and we give you a suggested message to use. Your congressional representatives need to hear from you! Here’s how to participate.

Paul and Zach: A Story of Resilience

In parts of rural Kentucky, the poverty rate is 50% higher than the national average. Here, the average salary for a 50-year-old man is just $12,000 a year. That’s not much, but for people who can’t find a job, that’s a fortune.

One of these folks is Paul – a burly man who seems like a modern day Grizzly Adams. Paul lives way outside of town with his son Zach. In most parts of our country, this house would be condemned. But this crumbling old house is home for this father and son team.

Here, surrounded by lush beauty, Paul is struggling to raise 8-year old Zach alone. He has no job, no steady source of income.  He lives off the land—and by earning money doing whatever he can.

Zach and His Father Paul
Zach and His Father Paul

Paul didn’t realize he even had a son until six years ago when he got a tip that an old girlfriend had a child who looked just like him.  The old girlfriend was a drug addict who was incapable of raising a child.

 

He immediately went to work to find the child who had been placed in foster care. After a full year of court hearings and parenting classes, he received full custody of this handsome boy who is a mix of white, black and Native American.

Paul was living in Ohio at the time he received custody of Zach, with a steady job as a bouncer at a club.  But the crime-ridden neighborhood was no place to raise a child, so he moved back to Kentucky to be in the land he loved, the land of his childhood.

He could never have dreamed that life could be this hard. The only house they can afford is 100 years old. They get their water from a water well that often runs dry. Indoor plumbing is a recent addition – they used an outhouse until a few months ago. An old wash tub is in the bathroom for washing the clothes. An old wood stove will keep the house warm in the winter—there is no indoor heating—but the shelves are lined with books and the house is fairly neat and organized.

The house is surrounded by 192 acres of corn fields and tobacco fields, all belonging to the landlord. Paul’s rent is $200 a month – a fee he works off by working the land.

Paul doesn’t feel sorry for himself and is more than happy to work hard. He’ll do just about anything to make money, from putting up hay to collecting recyclables. And he’s proud to say he’s lost 100 pounds doing hard labor over the past year or two. Still, Paul doesn’t always make enough to pay the rent… or the utilities… or buy food or gas. Thankfully he has a patient landlord who understands how tough times are.

These last few months have been especially hard. There’s been no money to buy food at the market, so Paul and Zach lived off the vegetables from the garden and the fruit on the trees. There was no money for meat, though they are able to hunt for food with Paul’s 50c shotgun. And he’s proud of his boy, who got his first squirrel and possum this summer – with a bow and arrow. But now the bow string is broken—and there’s no money to fix it.

TRIP1114  3When we ask Zach what it feels like when he is hungry, he lowers his eyes. “It makes me feel sad when I’m hungry….when I’m hungry, I get a little dizzy, like I am right now. I wish there was more food in the refrigerator. I wish there was ham or chicken….sometimes it gets really low.”

But Zach is an optimistic boy with a heart full of love for his dad. “We have a really good bond. That’s pretty much why we help each other. He loves me and I love him.”

It was a neighbor, Leroy, who first told us about this father-son family. He sees Zach get off the bus and knows how hungry he is every day.  Although Leroy is feeding eight people—including four grandchildren—Leroy welcomes Zach in and feeds him almost every day.

“That boy back in the holler,” Leroy tells us,  “I give him groceries because he don’t have nothing. He gets off the school bus and I boil hotdogs. I ask him, ‘You hungry honey, you want some hotdogs?’ And he says,‘Hotdogs are my favorite.’ I give him food because I know he don’t have nothing back there to eat.” Zach calls old Leroy his Pappaw.

There may be a shortage of food and money in this Kentucky community, but there’s no shortage of love and compassion.

In a country where many 8-year-old boys are demanding the latest tech toys and video games, this bright, articulate boy with so little has one big wish: “If I had more food, I’d feel great.  I’d be happy.  I’d have all the food I need.  All I need is more food.”

There are so many children like Zach in America—way too many. Can you help their wishes come true? On this Father’s Day, stand with Zach’s father Paul—and the parents all across the country who just want their kids to have the opportunity to be kids.

Championing One Child at a Time: Gerardo in El Salvador

At Feed the Children, we feed 350,000 kids every school day internationally. And on paper, it’s a large number. But in the midst of all the numbers we never want to forget the one child.’

In our logo, the “i” in the word “children” is lower case while the rest of the word is uppercase. It’s a great reminder for us all of us that we’re championing one child at a time.

Today, we want to tell you about one child named Gerardo from El Salvador.

ApgH1NxbYR-U3tGac0oR2U6mK8GMqbNIqUJl61BKq0QTen year old Gerardo lives with his aunt because his mother migrated to Guatemala to look for a job opportunity.

Gerardo lives in a small house located in the middle of a large plot of land. His house is made of cinder block the roof of zinc and the floors of bricks and tin doors.

Inside of Gerardo’s house, there’s a small living room, two bedrooms (one for Gerardo and one for his aunt, they sleep on a small and old mattress). They cook their meals over a firewood oven made of adobe. Their curtains over the windows are made of plastic bags.

Gerardo has electricity in his home but has to go outside to find a toilet.

Gerardo’s family income is around $80.00 US per month. This income mostly comes from his aunt’s work of selling eggs and tilapia to her neighbors.

Gerardo says, “Sometimes there is nothing to eat at home.”

But his story changes when he comes to school. At school, he receives a hot meal every day at the Feed the Children feeding center. His favorite foods to eat are: soy meat, beans with cheese and eggs.

When asked to explain more, Gerardo told a Feed the Children staffer: “I enjoy all the food that the Feeding Center gives me every day, it is delicious. I am so happy for that and when I am at the feeding center I feel that I am with my family.”

After lunch, he plays and laughs with his friends. He’s excited about learning. His favorite subject is Language and he loves reading.

His aunt says Gerardo now dreams about his future.

rU_7_wIkCQaGyyCxupnHXsCjjhv-6MH9H7DMMRpF6hkWhen he grows up, he wants to be a policeman because he does not like injustice. He wants to make a difference in his community. He wants to keep people safe.

Besides receiving food at school, his community now has a greenhouse and tilapia project, which teaches mothers in the community, like Gerardo’s aunt, about how to feed their families more nutritious food. Gerardo’s aunt says these Feed the Children projects have unified the community. Together, they are now pulling all of their resources together to make a better life for all of the children.

We asked Gerardo what he would like to say to his child sponsor and other Feed the Children donors, “Thank you Feed the Children for all the help you gave to me and my aunt. All the food is delicious.”

We are encouraged by the stories of kids like Gerardo and are reminded by the words of Mother Teresa who said, “If you can’t feed a hundred people, then feed just one.”

We can all help one child. We can all help champion kids like Gerardo.

To learn more about child sponsorship in El Salvador, click here.

Letter to My Feed the Children Family

Dear Feed the Children family,

As I write these words, I come before you with a heavy heart.

As I shared with all our staff during the Global Town Hall meeting this morning, I have chosen not to renew my contract with Feed the Children when it expires on May 31, 2015.

On June 1st, I will begin my new role as CEO of the American Diabetes Association based in Alexandria, VA.

This is not a decision that Elizabeth or I have entered into lightly or without much prayer and even sadness.

I began my work with you back in 2012 out of a deep sense of calling to this organization. I worked late nights, early mornings and weekends — out of that sense of calling.  My wife Elizabeth also felt called to support my work here. Together, over the last three years, we’ve given this mission of no child going to bed hungry our absolute all.

But now, we both believe that our calling has changed. We feel like the next chapter of our lives will be with the American Diabetes Association to lead the fight against the deadly consequences of this disease. Diabetes is a disease that has personally touched my own family, including my own parents. I am hopeful and would love to see a cure for diabetes in my lifetime.

But, please know, all of this does not change how Elizabeth and I feel about you, the Feed the Children family. We love you. We love the children our mission serves. And these past three years have been some of the most joyous ones of our lives.

We’ve done such important and life changing work together. Children have been fed. Schools have been built. Water has come to communities without any. Entire communities have been raised out of the cycle of poverty. And hear me say, I am so proud of you. I am so proud of the work we’ve done together. Any accomplishments I’ve achieved in this place are because of you who have made this journey alongside of us. While I know it may be difficult to understand our decision, sometimes the greatest thing a leader can do is know when to step aside so that the focus stays on the mission and not on them.

So, while I may no longer be the President and CEO of Feed the Children come June, the mission of Feed the Children is not one that I will leave behind. My wife and I will continue to support Feed the Children with our monthly donations, prayers and wishes for great success in the future.

And not only this, we have made many friends both in Oklahoma and in the field offices around the world—these are relationships for which we will forever be grateful. The joy of being in community with you, the global Feed the Children family, has taught us so much about what love really means. No matter where we come from or what our individual stories may be, we’ve connected in our common mission. No child should ever go without life’s essentials. And, I know we’ll continue loving the children who we’ve met along the way.

So, as the Hagan family enters into this new chapter of our lives come June, we ask for your prayers.

In the meantime, know that from now until May 31st, I will continue to do everything I can to pave a great path for your next President and CEO. Now, more than ever the children in our programs need all of our unified support.

Gratefully yours,

Kevin

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#Expanding the Table– U.S. Faith-Based Community Uniting to Defeat Summer Hunger

I live in Oklahoma, the state that ranks 51st on the list of kids that are on free and reduced lunch during the year that don’t eat during the summer.

This fact is unacceptable.

How could Feed the Children, one of the nation’s largest hunger organizations be headquartered in Oklahoma and not address the hunger needs in our own backyard?

I knew that during my tenure at Feed the Children, change would need to happen.

So, beginning with a conversation and challenge from Audrey Rowe, Administrator of USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) in 2013, Feed the Children made a plan.

We knew our lack of experience would limit us if we didn’t have support of partners. We’d need guides to contribute their wisdom to our efforts. And last year, USDA’s FNS along with No Kid Hungry gave us lots of great advice. With their encouragement, we began.

Last summer in Oklahoma City, Feed the Children rolled out our pilot Summer Food and Education Program in partnership with FNS, the Oklahoma Department of Education, PepsiCo Food for Good, local schools and churches to form the first coalition on childhood hunger in Oklahoma.

For 9 weeks, we served over 8,654 meals on site through the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and provided an additional 186,000 take-home meals to children and their families.

IMG_1715We learned that organizing community leaders around summer meal programs actually is not as daunting as we first thought. Church and other faith based groups with established programs for kids in the summer serve as built in partners and host sites.

And this is the good news I want to share: in one summer, Feed the Children’s efforts helped to increase the number of kids fed in the state of Oklahoma by 30%.

We still rank 51st but we know, in time, this fact about Oklahoma will change.

In light of our experiences, on Tuesday, February 3, FNS invited us to share our story at The White House.

Feed the Children, in partnership with the White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships and the USDA FNS, convened a forum called “Summer Meals 2015: Expanding the Table.”

I sat among 40 leading national and local faith-based and non-profit organizations–all showing our support for the 2015 Summer Food Service Program (SFSP).

As the session began, we heard from Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack who shared of his passion for no child going to bed hungry in the US. He reminded us that hungry kids in the US are hungry of no fault of their own. We all need to ban together to feed kids when school is out of session.

Next, I moderated a panel with community partners Dr. Kathy Krey, Director of Research for the Texas Hunger Initiative at Baylor University, and Dr. Judy Goforth Parker, Secretary of Health for the Chickasaw Nation, sharing stories of lessons learned from summer meals. For example, Dr. Krey spoke of the value of “everybody doing something.”

“Even if all you can do is assist at summer meal sites by opening up milk cartons for kids–do it,” she said. “We must all do our part.”

The forum resulted in the large community of leading nonprofit and faith-based organizations pledging their individual and organizational support and commitment to address summer hunger, the results of which will greatly impact children throughout America.

IMG_9146It was an imperative that I sign the pledge and become a summer meal champion.

Following the meeting, Feed the Children organized a Twitter Town Hall, using #ExpandingTheTable as the hashtag, to disseminate the message of support with those organizations at the forum and encourage others to join in the call to action. The conversation among leading advocates for hunger in the US included: FNS, No Kid Hungry, the Salvation Army, and Church World Service, and was incredibly informative.

The forum marks the first time the national faith-based community has collectively partnered with FNS in support of SFSP, which is typically organized on a grassroots level to provide free meals and snacks to low-income children during the summer months.

It was a good day at Feed the Children as we expanded our table to welcome even more partners.

I’m looking forward to what the future holds for Feed the Children as we feed even more children this summer in Oklahoma and beyond.

Rocking and Rolling for Hunger in New Orleans

Last weekend, Feed the Children participated in its first Rock N’ Roll Marathon in New Orleans. Our goals were simple: raise awareness and funds to defeat hunger and have fun doing it! 400 families in the Central City section received food and essential products for the week. Thomas Morstead of the New Orleans Saints served as our team captain. 

We hope this event was just the start of future pursuits for #TeamFeedtheChildren.  Heather Montgomery, a blogger shared her experience being a part of the weekend and we knew you’d be inspired by it. Here’s her story:

This past weekend, not only did I get to run my first post baby half marathon, but I got to meet up with fellow runners and bloggers, and do some good for the city of New Orleans. For those that don’t know, I was born right outside of the city in Metairie, and I grew up about 30 miles away. I still consider it home, as all of my family is still there, so I was excited to give back and help Feed the Children last Saturday. . . . .

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Feed the Children was the benefitting charity for this race, which I was happy to hear. We have been supporters of the charity for years, and it was really great to see them in action in the community. On this day, 400 families were going to be given food, toiletry items, haircuts, lunch, and fro yo! We arrived at the Apex youth center and a line had already formed outside.

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We arrived just in time to throw on some volunteer t-shirts and catch the end of the volunteer meeting.

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Families would go through the inside of the center and then out onto the basketball court where we had boxes of food and such. Whole Foods was there giving away fruit, and we manned the milk station.

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There was a DJ, a lot of amazing volunteers, and…..

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THOMAS MORSTEAD! He is the punter for the New Orleans Saints….and if you know ANYTHING about me, you know I love Saints football. Heck, I stalked Malcolm Jenkins in the New Orleans airport last year so I could get a picture. Thomas does a TON for the city of New Orleans. He is always in the news helping different charities, and it was so great to meet him. He actually took the time to talk to me which was super nice. He and his wife were running the 10k the next day, and he told me he wasn’t in running shape so he hoped a lot of people stopped him along the way so he could get a break! The coolest thing was not once did he “act famous”. He graciously took photos when asked, but I constantly saw him working, carrying boxes, and helping people…and it was awesome.

After my total geek out moment, it was back to work. I moved over to the boxes provided by AVON, helping hand them out to the grateful families.

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It was such an amazing experience getting to give back during a race weekend, and see where the charity money goes. Yes I could have been out on the beautiful day that is was exploring the city or enjoying my first baby free weekend with Bobby, but this was way, way more important, and I am so glad that Rock ‘n Roll made it possible for us to take part. We need to never forget while we are enjoying our racecations and running our miles, that there are families out there thankful just for a quart of milk and a free haircut. It really makes you realize how truly blessed we really are, and how great Rock ‘n Roll is for having a charity for their races!

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Thanks to Larisa for some of the photos!

QOTD: Have you ever helped out at a charity event?

Expanding the Table for Kids this Summer

For the more than 16 million children at risk of going hungry in the United States every day, summer break can be a tough time when it comes to finding a meal. With schools closed, kids on free and reduced lunch can’t count on three square meals a day.

The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) a federally funded program administered through the USDA office of Food and Nutrition (FNS) currently serves 3.5 million children each summer.

While this number is significant, it also means over 12 million kids aren’t eating lunch every day. The severity of the gap is frightening.

We can do better. We want to expand the table this summer to include more children. More tables need to be set. Many more children must be fed.

And, this is what we know: when government agencies, faith based groups and NGOs band together to support summer food service programs, the story changes. More children eat.

We’ve learned from FNS that Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) sites almost always organize on a grassroots level. Faith communities hold particular and bring unique value to this process.

Often faith groups host these program sites as part of their summer camps and classes for kids. Lunch is often built into already existing community programming. It’s a win, win for the organization and the children.

IMG_5506And so, to bolster these efforts, Feed the Children needs your help. We’d like to chat with you about how we can encourage more groups, in particular faith groups, to become a part of the Summer Food Service program.

Though it is only January, the time to organize is now. So that in June, more kids can count on three squares.

Tomorrow FNS will host a free webinar called, “Summer Meals: Engaging Faith Based and Neighborhood Groups.” If you’d like to join in the conversation with some thought leaders like Melissa Rogers, the Special Assistant to the President, Executive Director of the White House Office of Faith Based Partnerships, here’s more information.

And, to build on the momentum of this conversation, Feed the Children would like invite you to join us in a Twitter Town Hall on Tuesday, February 3rd.

In collaboration with the White House Office of Faith Based Partnerships and USDA Food and Nutrition Service, we’d like you to talk with us about how we can feed more children in the US this summer.

Here’s what you need to know:

What: Twitter Town Hall

When: Tuesday, February 3rd, 1-2 pm EST

Who:

  • Members of faith communities who have participated in a summer meal program,
  • Faith leaders who want to participate in a summer meal program
  • Anyone who feels it is an injustice that kids go without food during the summer

Where: #expandingthetable

Why: Because 12. 5 million children without lunch this summer is unacceptable

See you online @feedthechildren on Tuesday.

Making Your Year End Contributions Easy

It’s that time of year in the United States — with only three days left to think about your 2014 taxes — especially if you are a procrastinator like we are at our house.

It’s those days when you gather up receipts. You count your donations. And you ask yourself the question, did I give enough?

It’s the time of year you say to your spouse: “Wouldn’t you rather give our money to a charity than to pay taxes on it?”

If this is where you find yourself on this last week of 2014, then we have some great ideas for you to contribute in the most tangible of ways, at a variety of different price points.

1. Want to give less than $50?  Then why not give one food and one essential care box that feeds a family of four in the US for a week?

We recently told you the story of a Georgia family where the father lost his job but because of Feed the Children the kids had food for the week!  Giving this gift of $38 could mean the difference between hope and hopelessness for a family in the US.

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2. Want to give less than $100? Why not give a goat that will uplift a family in a country like Malawi?

Goats in places countries like Malawi, Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda, countries where we work, can mean the difference between prosperity and despair. We recently told you about a woman in Malawi who received two goats and it changed the course of her kids’ lives. Your donation could bring a smile like this!

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 3. Want to give give a gift that is just a little bit more? Could you give $113? With this end of year donation, you could provide all the food, care and support an abandoned baby needs to thrive in Kenya.

We recently told you the story of how one baby girl in our center came to us after a terrorist attack killed her parents. She found loving caregivers and hope for adoption because of Feed the Children donors. This could be you!

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If these price points don’t meet your needs– if you can give more or you could give less– here’s a link to a way you can make a donation in the amount of your choice.

Thank you donors, partners, and friends for helping Feed the Children champion kids all over the world!  We believe in a world where one day hunger will end, because together we will defeat it.