How Do I Become an Advocate?

Written by Andrew McNamee, Manager of Public Policy

Feed the Children fights hunger and poverty around the world. While our focus is on direct service to our beneficiaries, we also understand the massive scale of our mission. To truly defeat hunger in addition to being service provider, we must bring together like-minded organizations and advocates for our poorest communities. Our goal is systemic change to defeat hunger, and while we are a zealous advocate for good anti-hunger and anti-poverty policy, we are strictly non-partisan. We proudly work with all people of good faith who care about serving the poor.

Our Washington D.C. team regularly meets with members of Congress and their staffs, and we visited the offices of over 100 members last year. There is nothing that has more influence on a legislator than an informed and well engaged constituent. Personalized communications from a constituent stand out amid a sea of form letters and e-mails. They tell the legislator that the constituent cares about an issue enough to research his legislator’s position on the issue, compose a communication to the office, and consider the legislator’s actions on the issue when entering the voting booth. Moreover, they tell the legislator that the constituent is likely to vote.

Our efforts to affect policy in Washington D.C. depend on support from engaged and informed advocates that can reinforce our message with their members of Congress.

If you want to advocate on behalf of children in the U.S. and around the world, a good first step is to sign up for text updates from our government relations team by texting advocate to 51555, and replying yes.

We will text you when a vital issue being considered by Congress needs your immediate attention.

The next step is to get to know your members of Congress, their committee assignments, and their positions on issues related to food security and nutrition. You can find this information by submitting your address and selecting the member of Congress about whom you wish to learn, or by calling 1-800-826-3688 to be connected directly to your Representative or Senators. Explore your representatives’ websites to find out what positions they have previously taken on food security and nutrition-related issues. Some members of Congress, from both sides of the aisle, are considered “champions” on food security, but every member will have something to say about a broad piece of legislation like the farm bill, which includes authorization for child nutrition programs.

Once you know who they are, you should feel free to reach out! Introduce yourself by e-mail or phone call to let the office know that you’re interested in food security and nutrition. You can explain that you will be monitoring the lawmaker’s actions on those issues. If the lawmaker is holding events that are open to the public, attend those events and ask questions regarding the lawmaker’s commitment to your issues. You want a lawmaker to remember that they have a committed advocate living in the district when the issue comes up!

Finally, make sure to follow up with the legislator’s office when they act on an issue you are passionate about, to either thank them or respectfully express your displeasure at their position. Remember that these offices are constantly barraged by appeals, often in less-than-polite language. A sincere thank you, or even a respectfully-worded disagreement, can mean a lot to a legislator and his (often underappreciated and overworked) staff.

There are many opportunities to engage in advocacy related to food security and nutrition. Please sign up now to be an advocate for hungry children in the U.S. and worldwide!