2017 Year in Review: Feed the Children Successes and a Look Ahead

Written by Andrew McNamee, Manager of Public Policy

 

Feed the Children had several notable successes in 2017. These included:

  • Meetings with the staff of more than 100 members of Congress – We were in more than 100 meetings on Capitol Hill, with both Democratic and Republican offices, on a variety of topics, including emergency famine assistance funding, summer feeding for American children who receive free or reduced-price lunch at school, and school lunch debt shaming.
  • Supplemental famine spending of $1 billion – Due to ongoing conflicts, there were more people on the brink of famine in 2017 than in any year since 1945. Feed the Children and other internationally-focused NGOs (non-government organizations) pushed for $1 billion in supplemental funding to be included in a continuing resolution to address these famines, and we learned in May that our collective effort was successful! (The supplemental funding and all U.S. expenditures on international relief and development constitutes less than 1% of the U.S. federal budget, but the money is critical to preventing famine and stimulating development.)
  • Hurricane relief – The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season was especially active and deadly. When hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria made landfall in the U.S., it caused nearly $370 billion in estimated damage and collectively caused at least 700 deaths. However, it is feared that the lives lost due to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico have been drastically undercounted.
  • Malawi – Tiwalere II – In 2017, we were awarded the largest grant in our history to continue our critical work in Malawi – to end extreme poverty and hunger. USAID gave $19.15 million through the Global Development Alliance mechanism to match the amount raised by our organization and our partners, Nu Skin and the Procter & Gamble Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program. Tiwalere II, meaning “let’s raise them up” in the local Chichewa dialect, follows the success of the smaller Tiwalere I project that improved nutrition for orphans and vulnerable children in Malawi from 2010 to 2015. Tiwalere II will focus on educating pregnant and lactating women, mothers, their young children, and adolescent girls on best practices related to ensuring young children receive adequate nutrition.
  • Summer Food & Education Program – This was the fourth year we operated our Summer Food and Education Program (SFEP) in coordination with USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service. Our SFEP provides meals to children who receive free or reduced-price lunch during the school year to ensure they don’t experience malnutrition throughout the summer. Meal sites are often located at libraries, camps, churches, or schools, where children can participate in educational and athletic programs to ensure they don’t fall behind in school during the summer months.

 

A Look Ahead

  • We plan to build on our success as we move further into 2018. Our Washington D.C. team will continue to regularly meet with Congressional offices. We will encourage them to make vital improvements to nutrition programs outlined in the farm bill. The farm bill is passed every five years. It is the mechanism that authorizes all agricultural and nutrition programs.
  • We will utilize the lessons learned from disaster response efforts to improve our response in the future, and we will increase our partnerships with other organizations focused on disaster response.
  • Finally, we’re looking to utilize the Global Development Alliance funding mechanism to possibly recreate the success of our Tiwalere II project in Central America, Kenya, and Tanzania.