Pay-It-Forward from Australia to Nicaragua to the Neighbor Next Door

At its most basic level, a chicken module is simply 10 hens and one rooster that we give to a family to raise. But it’s much more than that. A chicken module is a life-changer.

They say it takes a village to raise a child — sometimes it takes a few. A recent visit by His Excellency Tim George, Australian Ambassador to Mexico and Accredited to Nicaragua, revealed how teamwork around the world is inspiring Feed the Children’s work in Latin America.

Mr. George met Angelica when he visited our Productive Training Center in El Crucero last month. She received a chicken module several months ago through our pay-it-forward process.

angelica rooster blog crop

At its most basic level, a chicken module is simply 10 hens and one rooster that we give to a family to raise. But it’s much more than that. A chicken module is a life-changer. It provides fresh eggs, meat, and income for a family that is otherwise severely limited in resources. Even beyond this, it is help offered to a neighbor. Each family we give a chicken module to will then raise another module to give to a neighboring family, creating a positive cycle of self-reliance for an entire community.

Angelica has been able to triple the number of hens we gave her. She has done so well with the chickens that not only can she feed her family fresh eggs every day, but she has enough extra to sell in the local market.

chayote squash blog crop
Angelica has branched out beyond the chicken module into vegetable gardening. This is chayote, a Nicaraguan squash.
ambassador egg
Australian ambassador Tim George with freshly picked eggs

The families in El Crucero thrill to show off what they’ve accomplished with the chicken modules. They made the ambassador’s visit an opportunity to thank their donors for supporting a program that’s made such a difference in their lives. Today, the community of El Crucero is raising healthy chickens, producing in the greenhouse, and running their new bakery facilities.

El Crucero illustrates how people from the U.S. to Australia to Nicaragua can come together to build community self-sufficiency programs.

Since partnering with Feed the Children in 2011, the Australian Embassy in Mexico has played a key role in helping families in need in Latin America. In just the last couple of years, their donated funds have made a measurable difference:

  • In Honduras we built two bakeries, benefiting 540 children and their families.
  • In Guatemala we provided 20 chicken modules, benefiting 244 children and their families.
  • In El Salvador we provided 20 chicken modules, benefiting 110 children and their families; and we provided another 20 chicken modules, benefiting 174 children and their families.
Veronica’s family received their chicken module two months ago!
Veronica’s family received their chicken module two months ago!

Community building takes teamwork between generous donors, effective programs, and willing participants. Without any one of these elements, this kind of community strengthening can’t happen. But it is happening—and it’s exciting to see. With funding from partners like the Australian embassy, our programs are making a real difference in helping families in El Crucero to develop new skills and earn income.

El Crucero is full of success stories like Angelica’s:

  • Brenda sold the first pick of eggs and, from those earnings, she was able to purchase a pig that she’s now fattening up to sell later for a significant profit.
  • Leticia and Veronica received their chicken modules just two months ago and their families are able to eat fresh eggs for breakfast.
  • Veronica’s new livelihood has created quite the demand—her neighbors come to her house looking for the delicious bread she makes at our center. 

This means their children have food for today and hope for the future.

girl with rooster SM

Years ago, we tested this community-development program in El Salvador. An Australian official visited, was impressed with our work there, and spread the word. Our international office staff worked together, shared their experiences, and helped each other craft proposals and reports to send to others willing to consider supporting this program in additional communities. Soon we got funding for Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua too.

Cooperation is how this program began, and cooperation is how it thrives.

Teamwork, both between our international offices and with partners from Australia to Alaska, demonstrates that we are a competent and professional organization. We will continue collaborating with each other, with our partners, and with the communities we serve, so that we continue see people moving toward self-sufficiency and sustainability.

Together, our hope grows.

If you’d like to partner with us in providing hope, learn more about the chicken modules HERE.